School Heritage

Our Heritage

Dulwich College Yangon Pun Hlaing joined the Dulwich College International (DCI) family of schools in 2015, and our Star City campus opened in 2017.

Our links to Dulwich College, founded in 1619, are strong, and we collaborate closely with the other schools in the network to encourage an international outlook and create an extended community where academic ability is fostered, creativity is valued, and diversity is celebrated. We are proud to share a common heritage with all the schools in the DCI network.

Pastoral Care and the House System

The system of pastoral care is strong at Dulwich College Yangon Star City.

Our class teachers and form tutors are responsible not only for every student’s academic development, but also for ensuring they receive the pastoral support they need. Our school has a pastoral support team for students at all levels, and all of them follow a Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) course appropriate to their age and coordinated across the year groups.

Our House system is an integral part of the College pastoral care structure. Many international school students experience a great deal of change in their lives. As their parents move from country to country, they make new friends and adapt to different cultures and school systems. We ensure that children are welcomed into the Dulwich community, that we know them well and that they are supported during their time at the College.

The House system gives students the opportunity to learn valuable lessons and create memorable experiences outside the classroom. Through their participation in House activities, students learn about leadership, create bonds with students in other year groups and can try their hand at all sorts of activities they may not otherwise do – singing, playing a new sport, or even cooking.

Our House Captains are responsible for helping to organise House activities, which normally take the form of friendly competitions.

Our Houses

On arriving at our school, students and staff are allocated to one of four Houses, where they will remain during their time with us. Our Houses are named after inspirational and accomplished people: Anawratha Minsaw, Marie Curie, Amy Johnson, and Ernest Shackleton.

  • Anawratha
  • Named for Anawrahta Minsaw (1014 – 1077-8). Anawrahta Minsaw helped lay the foundation for modern day Myanmar after he united his region into the Pagan Empire. As King, he pioneered an administrative ruling system and revolutionised the agricultural practices of the empire; as the father of a nation his legacy remains in Burmese culture as one of the most famous rulers and innovators in the region’s history.  
  • Curie
  • Named for Marie Curie (1867 – 1934). Marie Curie was not only the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, but was the first person – woman or man – to win the prize twice. In 1903 she shared the Physics prize with her husband, Pierre, and in 1911 she won the prize in Chemistry. Born in Warsaw, she emigrated to France as a result of her political activism, and repeatedly made history for her groundbreaking scientific achievements, particularly her research on radioactivity.
  • Johnson
  • Named for Amy Johnson (1903 – 1941). Amy Johnson was an intrepid British aviator and the first female pilot to fly solo from Britain to Australia. She set numerous flight records during her career and rose to First Officer in the British Air Transport Auxiliary during the Second World War, transporting Royal Air Force aircraft.
  • Shackleton
  • Named for Ernest Shackleton (1874 – 1922). Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton was born in Ireland, graduated from Dulwich College and is hailed as one of the greatest explorers of the 20th century. Known for his great leadership and perseverance, Shackleton led a Trans-Antarctic Expedition in 1915 that met disaster when his ship, the Endurance, became trapped in the polar ice. Shackleton led his men to shelter and then sailed out in a small open boat (now on display at Dulwich College London) to seek help. He returned and rescued his crew, all of whom survived the ordeal.

Uniform

Students from Reception to Year 11 will wear the school uniform. School uniform isn't about conformity, but reflects a long-standing tradition from the founding school and is a badge of pride and school identity.